NFU Scotland | /dairy.aspx

SAVED: PAGE: ACTIVE AREA:
Title:
Type ID:
10
Type: ID:
299
Active:
True
Parent:
2
Pos:
0
Style:
Title:
Type ID:
7
Type:
Slider
ID:
400159
Active:
True
Parent:
1
Pos:
0
Style:
Title:
Type ID:
1
Type:
Text
ID:
1274
Active:
True
Parent:
3
Pos:
0
Style:

Dairy


What is happening with ex-farm milk haulage?

We would recommend the following is considered:

  • The following weeks are going to be a busy time for all, with the anticipation that in some cases there may be a reduction of staffing levels at all stages of the supply chain from farm to consumer.
  • It is important to keep in contact with your milk buyer/haulier to ensure you are clear on any contingency plan they may implement going forward.
  • We would ask that you are clear on any liability issues if your milk is not uplifted, i.e. specific buyer protocol, insurance cover etc.  This may vary depending on who buys your milk and your specific insurance cover.
  • It is important you follow government advice on social distancing when tanker drivers are on farm making collections. Ensuring dedicated hand washing facilities for tanker drivers are well maintained will also be helpful.  The following links will help with general advice https://www.nhsinform.scot/coronavirus and https://www.gov.scot/news/workplace-advice-contained-in-new-coronavirus-guidance/ 
  • Please be aware this whole situation is fast moving and changing daily.  We will update this document when appropriate

For guidance on Milk Recording

https://www.thecis.co.uk/news/coronavirus
 

The latest industry data, analysis and insights from the dairy sector to help inform your business decisions.

https://ahdb.org.uk/dairy-markets

Looking for Specific Dairy Help?

The Scottish Dairy Hub is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.
www.scottishdairyhub.org.uk


Dairy Producer Guidance for land application of uncollected milk in Scotland

Background

The Scottish Environment Protection Agency (SEPA) is committed to supporting everyone it regulates during the Covid-19 outbreak, whilst maintaining protection of Scotland’s environment. SEPA will listen, and quickly respond to challenges as they emerge and welcomes early discussions with operators to achieve shared solutions.

SEPA expects everyone it regulates to take all reasonable steps to remain in compliance with Scotland’s environmental laws. SEPA also expects operators to be preparing themselves as far as practical for the challenges of the Covid-19 outbreak with the aim of ensuring that impacts on the environment are minimised.

Multi-agency regulatory guidance

Multi-agency guidance has been prepared for Dairy Producers in Scotland whose milk is uncollected during the Covid-19 pandemic and where, unfortunately, disposal by land application at the farm where it was produced becomes necessary. SEPA has developed this guidance with the Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA), the Scottish Government, Scottish Government Rural Payments and Inspections Division (SGRPID), with National Farmers Union Scotland (NFUS) and the Scottish Dairy Hub both aware and supportive. Disposing of milk to land is subject to Animal By-Products legislation enforced by the APHA. SEPA has included pollution prevention measures alongside precautions set out by the APHA. SGRPID has offered advice to farmers on meeting Nitrate Vulnerable Zone requirements.

It has been identified that the National Emergency for the Coronavirus pandemic could lead to raw milk remaining uncollected on farms in Scotland and that this may mean that such milk may require to be disposed of.
If such unfortunate circumstances were to arise, the following guidance is in place:

  • It is vital that milk is not allowed to directly discharge to a surface water drainage system or watercourse. This is because the presence of milk will strip out oxygen from the watercourse, seriously impacting its ecology, including causing fish deaths.
  • SEPA, Scottish Government, SGRPID and APHA have taken the position that raw milk may be applied to land as an organic fertiliser/soil improver without processing.


What should I do with my uncollected milk?  

In the case where milk cannot be collected from your farm, and you need to empty your bulk tank you should take action as follows:

  • Drain your bulk tank to the farm slurry storage system.
  • The slurry/milk mixture may be applied to land in accordance with GBR18 of the Controlled Activities Regulations. 
  • If in a Nitrate Vulnerable Zone, spread within the limits of the action programme and/or farm nutrient management plan. 
  • The slurry/milk mixture may be applied in a single application at a maximum rate of 30m3/ha. 
  • No repeat applications to the same parcel of land within three weeks.  
  • Following land application no livestock are allowed on that land for at least 21 days.

If you are unable to comply with this guidance please contact nationalrural@sepa.org.uk before applying milk to land.

A series of contingency plan documents to help guide stand-in or relief staff in some of the routine, daily tasks.

https://www.fas.scot/livestock/dairy-cattle/employing-people-on-the-dairy-farm/



Animal feed

Are Feed supplies affected?

The feed industry has experienced a knock-on effect from the closure of distilleries, mainly caused by staff shortages. These closures are likely to make draff, and other moist or wet by-products, along with distillers dark gains harder to source.  

Haulage for now is managing however it is getting harder to source as time goes on. Mainly due to staff shortages being an issue, but also with the closure of quarries, sawmills etc. lorries are not getting loads to collection points or return loads after deliveries which is now pushing up their rates. This could become a problem for fertiliser delivery.  

Actions to take now are to speak with your feed suppliers and ensure orders are placed well ahead of time due to both seasonal demand and the availability of delivery drivers. Forward planning also allows suppliers to have the best opportunity to source the product required or alternatives if necessary.

In terms of changing diets, if your usual diet ingredients are not available, try to transition them gradually introducing the new feed over 2 weeks.  This Feed Advisory Service (FAS) sheet may also help https://www.fas.scot/downloads/feeding-beef-cattle-sheep-practical-guide/  

The key message from the feed industry is not to panic! Although there has been a sudden increase in the price of raw materials (soya +£100, rapeseed meal +£40, distillers +£30, grain +£10-15), the medium to long term picture is better. The global supply of soya, wheat, maize and barley looks good which should therefore temper prices. Communication with shippers and home producers suggest they are continuing to function as normal.


©NFU Scotland • All Rights Reserved • Web design by Big Red DigitalLog in

Close

Contact Us

 

 

 

No Robots:

This form collects and sends the information supplied to NFU Scotland. You can read our privacy policy for full details on how we protect and manage your data.
  I consent to having NFU Scotland collect the above details.