NFU Scotland | /covid19-testing.aspx

SAVED: PAGE: ACTIVE AREA:
Title:
Type ID:
7
Type:
Slider
ID:
400163
Active:
True
Parent:
1
Pos:
0
Style:
Title:
Type ID:
1
Type:
Text
ID:
1282
Active:
True
Parent:
3
Pos:
0
Style:
Title:
Type ID:
10
Type: ID:
303
Active:
True
Parent:
2
Pos:
0
Style:

COVID-19 Testing


The Scottish Government's Test and Protect Scheme
From Thursday 28 May, the Scottish Government implemented a new Test and Protect strategy.  It follows a ‘test, trace, isolate, support’ approach.

More information is available here: https://www.gov.scot/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-test-and-protect/

What is the Test and Protect Scheme?

Under this new process, anyone with COVID-19 symptoms, which includes a fever, loss or change in smell or taste or a cough, must book a test via NHS Inform or calling 0800 028 2816.
Anyone with symptoms must self-isolate for 7 days and their household must self-isolate for 14 days.

What happens if the test is positive?

If the test returns a positive result for COVID-19, NHS contact traces will contact the individual to identify who they have been in contact with. ‘Close contacts’ will be required to self-isolate for 14 days.

What is a ‘close contact’?

A close contact is some who:

  • Has been living in the same household as a case,
  • Has had face-to-face contact with a someone who has had contact with a positive case for any length of time, within 1 metre. This includes contact such as: having skin-to-skin contact with someone, traveling in a small vehicle with a case or having a face-to-face conversation.
  • Has had extended close contact with a positive case (between 1 and 2 metres for more than 15 minutes).


What are the implications for my business?

It is important to maintain physical distancing in the workplace to protect your workforce and minimise any possible disruption that may occur if a team member tests positive for COVID-19.
If you have an unavoidable situation where staff may become with 2 meters of each other, ensure you have carried out a specific risk assessment, consider if additional safety measures are required.  


Self-Isolation

The government has stated it essential to use self-isolation to limit the severity and spread of this evolving infection across the UK.

It is essential to self-isolate if:

  • You have been told to self-isolate by a doctor or NHS 111,
  • You have COVID-19 symptoms, 
  • Someone in your household has COVID-19 symptoms.
  • You have been identified as being in ‘close contact’ with a person who has tested positive for COVID-19.

This checklist also applies for any workers you may have in your farming business.

What should you do if you, or someone in your household develops symptoms of COVID-19?
Current guidance from the Scottish Government stated that from 13 March, anyone developing symptoms of COVID-19 must self-isolate for 7 days.  If symptoms worsen during home isolation or are no better after 7 days people are advised to phone their GP or contact NHS24 (111). 

  • If you have symptoms and live with others, the rest of the household must enter 14 days of self-isolation,
  • All family members who do not display any COVID-19 symptoms should self-isolate for 14 days, 
  • If those with symptoms feel better and do not display COVID-19 symptoms after 7 days of displaying symptoms, they can return to social distancing measures,
  • If a person in the household develops symptoms late in the 14-day isolation period, they cannot leave the house for 7 further days. This does not extend the 14-day period for others.

NHS Inform guidance is available here: https://www.nhsinform.scot/illnesses-and-conditions/infections-and-poisoning/coronavirus-covid-19

Schools

As of Friday 20 March, schools and nurseries across Scotland will close and the SQA exam diet for 2020 will not proceed as planned.

Confirming the decision to the Scottish Parliament, the Deputy First Minister John Swinney set out that local authorities are being encouraged to work with local childcare providers in the private and third sectors to ensure ongoing provision to enable key workers to remain in work.

Key workers are defined as “those who work in posts which ensure that essential services can be delivered, or those who cover tasks within the local community which support the vulnerable and aid community resilience.

Whilst it is understood that the exact definition will vary based on local needs, NFUS is seeking urgent recognition to ensure that the children of workers in the agricultural, ancillary (processing, haulage, veterinary, distribution) sectors are included.

Further details on what the school closures entail are online here: https://www.gov.scot/news/update-on-school-closures-and-exams/

Is there a COVID-19 risk from domestic animals or livestock?

Government guidance states, there is limited evidence that companion animals such as dogs and cats can be infected with COVID-19 and no evidence that livestock can be infected.  There is no evidence that animals are involved in the ongoing transmissions of COVID-19 to humans.


©NFU Scotland • All Rights Reserved • Web design by Big Red DigitalLog in

Close

Contact Us

 

 

 

No Robots:

This form collects and sends the information supplied to NFU Scotland. You can read our privacy policy for full details on how we protect and manage your data.
  I consent to having NFU Scotland collect the above details.