crops

SAVED: PAGE: ACTIVE AREA:
Agricultural Holdings Brexit Crofting Crops Dairy Environment & Land Use Food Supply Chain Legal Livestock Pigs and PoultrySupport Payments & Grants
Title:
Type ID:
7
Type:
Slider
ID:
35
Active:
True
Parent:
1
Pos:
0
Style:
Title:
Type ID:
2
Type:
Image
ID:
1247
Active:
True
Parent:
4
Pos:
0
Style:
margin-bottom:30px;
Title:
Type ID:
1
Type:
Text
ID:
1207
Active:
True
Parent:
2
Pos:
0
Style:
Title:
Type ID:
1
Type:
Text
ID:
1149
Active:
True
Parent:
3
Pos:
1
Style:
Title:
Type ID:
1
Type:
Text
ID:
387
Active:
True
Parent:
1
Pos:
1
Style:
Title:
Type ID:
1
Type:
Text
ID:
492
Active:
True
Parent:
2
Pos:
1
Style:
margin-bottom:20px;
Title:
Type ID:
2
Type:
Image
ID:
1172
Active:
True
Parent:
4
Pos:
1
Style:
Title:
Type ID:
1
Type:
Text
ID:
730
Active:
True
Parent:
3
Pos:
2
Style:
Title:
Type ID:
4
Type:
News Feed
ID:
0
Active:
True
Parent:
4
Pos:
6
Style:
Title:
Type ID:
7
Type:
Slider
ID:
400220
Active:
True
Parent:
3
Pos:
9
Style:
Title:
Type ID:
1
Type:
Text
ID:
1462
Active:
True
Parent:
2
Pos:
9
Style:
Title:
Type ID:
7
Type:
Slider
ID:
400227
Active:
True
Parent:
3
Pos:
10
Style:
margin-top:30px
Title:
Type ID:
19
Type:
Consultations
ID:
0
Active:
True
Parent:
2
Pos:
10
Style:
Title:
Type ID:
16
Type:
Business Guides
ID:
0
Active:
True
Parent:
3
Pos:
15
Style:
margin-bottom:30px;
Title:
Type ID:
18
Type:
Committee Meeting
ID:
0
Active:
True
Parent:
3
Pos:
16
Style:
Title:
Type ID:
18
Type:
Committee Meeting
ID:
0
Active:
True
Parent:
3
Pos:
17
Style:


Willie Thomson
Combinable Crops Committee Chair

To contact Willie, please email david.michie@nfus.org.uk

David Michie
Policy Manager - Crops
07842 306461
david.michie@nfus.org.uk

Potato Cyst Nematode: A Big Problem and A Solution

NFU Scotland’s potato working group want a legislation change to prohibit potatoes from being grown more than one year in six in any piece of land. This is a big ask. It will restrict what you can grow on your land and will reduce the supply of potato growing land, particularly in areas like Angus. NFU Scotland are engaging with the wider potato growing membership to understand the impact of this change, explore how legislation could change, and identify exactly what sort of change is needed.



Why lobby for a legislation change?
Potato Cyst Nematode (PCN) is a big problem. According to Scotland’s Plant Health Centre it has infested over 13% of land for growing potatoes and bulbs and is doubling every 7-8 years. This is an increase in spread of 5% per year. If PCN spread is allowed to continue losses of £125 million are predicted by 2040, and this figure excludes job losses and impacts on exports and the wider GB food industry. If trends continue it could mean the end of seed potato and bulb production across the whole of Scotland by 2050.

PCN populations can be reduced with a long crop rotation, so why is this not happening? A lot of land used to grow potatoes is rented on a seasonal basis, with high rental prices driving farm business decisions to rent land out for potatoes. As PCN populations increase, the supply of suitable land is reduced, increasing its rental value. In turn, high rental values incentivise shorter crop rotations, increasing PCN populations. This vicious circle makes the PCN problem worse. Short-term high rental income outweighs the longer-term benefits of reducing PCN populations, particularly when those renting the land out do not have potato enterprises themselves. A big problem like this needs a big solution – legislation change.

Potato plant health: an NFUS priority
Plant health has been identified as the potato working group’s biggest priority, and the working group are lobbying for changes to cement Scotland’s reputation as a high-quality potato producing nation. The working group have agreed the best way to tackle the PCN problem quickly is through legislation. This will complement other actions like resistant varieties, precision sampling, and good practice messaging about groundkeeper control. Without legislation change these actions are not enough to halt the spread of PCN.

In the longer term a legislation change will result in a growing, rather than shrinking, area of PCN-free land to grow potatoes. As the market for PCN-resistant varieties grows and other actions are put in place, PCN levels will fall more quickly. In the long-run potato growers throughout Scotland will all benefit from this change, and Scotland will maintain its reputation for high quality food and farming.

Crops Policy Blogs

SASA informal consultation response on seed potatoes

Contracts

IPM Plan

Horticulture Working Group Chair: Iain Brown

Potato Working Group Chair: Mike Wilson

National Test Programme – Track 1 – Preparing for Sustainable Farming (PSF)

02-05-2022

At NFU Scotland’s Autumn Conference Cabinet Secretary Mairi Gougeon MSP announced the National Test Programme (NTP) was to be developed to...

Read More...
Pesticide Users: Requirement to Register

13-04-2022

The Official Controls (Plant Protection Products) Regulations 2020 have now come into force requiring all farm businesses using pesticides to register...

Read More...
CAP Payments Schedule 2022

31-03-2022

The Scottish Government published its latest CAP payments schedule in March 2022 The Rural Payments Strategy for 2022 is aiming to...

Read More...
Cereal Survey 2019

Click to download the 2018 Harvest Results

Related News
Huge Rise in Fertiliser Price Creating Cost Crisis

13-12-2021

The huge surge in fertiliser prices has made business planning and nutrient management a financial nightmare for Scottish farmers and growers....

Read More...
Good Conditions for Scotland’s 2021 Harvest and a Great Start Made to Autumn Planting for 2022 Crop

29-09-2021

Reports from around the country suggest Scotland’s 2021 harvest has been relatively straight forward due to long spells of dry weather...

Read More...
NFU Scotland Launches Harvest Survey

31-08-2021

The signs are that this year’s harvest has been a good one but NFU Scotland wants a bit more detail than...

Read More...

Quick Contact

 
 
Which Region do you live in?  
Are you a member of NFU Scotland?  
 
 

This form collects and sends the information supplied to NFU Scotland. You can read our privacy policy for full details on how we protect and manage your data.
  I consent to having NFU Scotland collect the above details.

Address

NFU Scotland
Head Office
Rural Centre - West Mains
Ingliston, Midlothian
EH28 8LT

Tel: 0131 472 4000
Email: info@nfus.org.uk

NFU Mutual Logo

Get the App

NFUS App QR Code

©NFU Scotland • All Rights Reserved • Web design by Big Red DigitalLog in

Close

Contact Us

 

 

 

No Robots:

This form collects and sends the information supplied to NFU Scotland. You can read our privacy policy for full details on how we protect and manage your data.
  I consent to having NFU Scotland collect the above details.